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Law Office of
Ronald A. Cabanayan

DUI ~ Criminal Defense ~ Immigration/Naturalization

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to COVID-19 virus, we are we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Justice Is On Your Side

Facial recognition could lead to false criminal accusations

Once when store owners found stock was missing, they would review the security camera footage for an image of someone stealing the stock. The police would then look to see if they recognized the person. Those images were often of poor quality and unreliable, making identification challenging.

When you enter a store in the U.S., there are still cameras watching you. However, many of these cameras now use facial recognition software. They take an image they capture and compare it to a database. The problem is, the images the cameras capture can still be poor.

When you need a photo for an official document such as a passport or driving license, there are strict rules about how you need to appear in the picture. The lighting has to be a certain way, and your hair cannot cover your eyes. These factors can make it difficult to identify someone. Yet, the police have arrested people based on poor images that facial recognition identified as them.

There is little legal control over the use of facial recognition

You might think you have a right to privacy when you walk out on the street or into a store. Yet, the cameras are keeping track of you. Once your face gets into a facial recognition database, other surveillance systems can search it.

You might think your photo is not in a facial recognition database. Yet your face links to your name in many places. Anywhere from your social media account to your passport and drivers’ license. The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) also has a contract with a facial recognition company. If accused of a crime, it is essential to explore why someone is identifying you.