When the police use DUI checkpoints, they often target times when they believe there may be an increase in impaired driving, such as the weekend. That’s what they did with a recent checkpoint in California, which started late on a Friday night and ran into Saturday morning.

When all was said and done, the police had made 17 arrests and/or citations.

However, it is important to note that the arrests were for more than just drunk driving or driving under the influence of drugs. That’s the main goal of the checkpoint, but it still means that police can stop and check every driver who goes through. This often leads to arrests for other issues that they may not otherwise have noticed.

In this specific case, only one arrest was for impaired driving. The other 16 arrests/citations were for licensing issues, such as driving without a license, driving on a suspended license or driving on a revoked license.

The police also towed five vehicles and gave out 22 additional traffic citations. In total, they had 534 different vehicles that came through the checkpoint. They let nearly 500 of them go on without incident, but they sent 40 of them to secondary screenings. These screenings resulted in the arrest and citation statistics noted above. While that shows that most drivers do not have a problem at checkpoints, they still result in serious ramifications for a lot of drivers who may not have gotten pulled over otherwise.

If you get arrested during a traffic stop or at a checkpoint, make sure you are well aware of your legal rights.